Journal of Christian Ministry | The Intersection of Burmese, Korean, and American Cultures
26
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The Intersection of Burmese, Korean, and American Cultures

The Intersection of Burmese, Korean, and American Cultures

The Intersection of Burmese, Korean, and American Cultures in DMin Education
John Park, PhD

Drawing on the author’s experiences working with DMin students at Central Baptist Theological Seminary, including recent interactions with students from Myanmar, Korea, and the United States, this paper discusses the insights gained.

I took an inventory of what already existed and what seemed to be lacking. What already existed was three different tracks and three cultures represented in the program, yet members of the three tracks (for students from America, Korea, and Myanmar) had not been interacting with one another as much as I wished, and there had been a lack of intentional initiatives.

I began working for Central Baptist Theological Seminary (hereafter, CBTS) as the new director of the Doctor of Ministry Program on July 1, 2017. When I started, I was asked by the dean, Dr. Robert Johnson, to develop initiatives for the DMin Program. So I formulated three initiatives: an academic initiative, a recruitment initiative, and a global learning initiative. As part of the global learning initiative, I took an inventory of what already existed and what seemed to be lacking. What already existed was three different tracks and three cultures represented in the program, yet members of the three tracks (for students from America, Korea, and Myanmar) had not been interacting with one another as much as I wished, and there had been a lack of intentional initiatives.

Thus, in consultation with my dean, I decided to bring members of the three tracks together to interact, to get to know one another, and to learn from one another regarding their country and culture, ministry challenges, and other issues. We held an event called An Evening of Global Learning, designed to promote mutual caring and interaction.

This article will explain what I saw and learned from hosting the Myanmar students as they took two-week classes at CBTS and experienced American culture and churches, and from interactions between the Myanmar, Korean, and American students, especially at the event, An Evening of Global Learning, which drew members of the three different tracks.